Eating Alone In Half The Time

tsingle.info/blog

Eating Alone In Half The Time header image 2

More About English

February 14th, 2013 · No Comments

Backup 

Below are two short, short lessons on  (1) a list of other words to use instead of always using the word ‘but’, and (2) a quasi rule to help decide where to put the emphasis in a word.

1. Do you want to find other ways to say ‘BUT’?

We often find ourselves using the word ‘but’ all of the time to
 express an opposite fact, action or feeling. However, there are many other words which can frequently take the place of ‘but’ and give you more latitude and variation in your speech, and writing.
 
Example of a sentence with ‘but’: I want to go, but I have decided to stay here.
The following are substitute expressions for the word ‘but‘ either used in the same sentence, or used to start a new sentence:
 
Usually used in the same sentence after a comma:
     example: I want to go, yet I have decided to stay here.
 
yet
although
though
whereas
except
even though
only
notwithstanding the fact that
but then
but for now
 
Examples: same sentence
    I want to go, although I have decided to stay here.
    I want to go, except I have decided to stay here.
    I want to go, notwithstanding the fact that I have decided to stay here.
    I want to go, but then, I have decided to stay here.
_______________________________
 
 
Other words for ‘but’ usually used to start a new sentence or after the punctuation marks ‘;’ and ‘:’
  Example: I want to go. However, I have decided to stay here.
 
however
nevertheless
nonetheless
then again
still
on the other hand
on the contrary
conversely
contrarily
alternatively
in contrast
anyway
still
in any case
anyhow
at any rate
 
Examples: For starting a new sentence
    I want to go. Then again, I have decided to stay here.
    I want to go. On the other hand, I have decided to stay here.
    I want to go. Nonetheless, I have decided to stay here.

 ___________________________________________________
 
 
 
 Woodworks – Sometimes the beauty is right under foot

2. WHERE IS THE STRESS ON SYLLABLES IN MULTISYLLABLE WORDS?
 
 We are often faced with the problem of where to place the stress in multisyllable words.
One quasi-rule may help in some cases depending on what figure of speech is being used: noun, adjective, or verb.
Basically the rule is as follows: If it’s a noun or an adjective, the emphasis is usually on the first syllable.
 
THAT’S IT. 
 
1. nouns and adjectives: emphasis is usually on the 1st syllable
 
Nouns:  table victory entrance number surface problem terminal capital
 
Adjectives: slender clever happy careful adequate
 
2. verbs: emphasis is usually on the 2nd syllable. Verbs: extol decide begin 
neglect receive complete inspect extend include  
 
Even words which are spelled exactly the same but have a different meaning as a noun, an adjective or a verb, place the emphasis on different parts of the word. Remember: first syllable for nouns and adjectives, second syllable for verbs.
 
examples:
record: They have a record (n) of every sale which they record (v) at the time of each transaction.  
 
present: He wanted to present (v) the present (gift) (n) to his girlfriend while her mother was present (adj)
 
import: the latest import (n) was something they had wanted to import (v) for many years. 
 
entrance (put under a spell): It was her idea to entrance (v) the audience with her unusual entrance (n) on stage. 
 
Warning: there are many exceptions to this rule.
 
___________________________ 
Also see some additional two syllable words at:
http://www.grammar.net/same-word-different-meaning
 
 

Tags: one pan cooking · pronunciation identical words different figures of speech

0 responses so far ↓

  • There are no comments yet...Kick things off by filling out the form below.

Leave a Comment